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Raising money and reducing plastics at Ipswich School

Big cheque presentation to MCS

Pupils and staff at Ipswich School have introduced a number of new ways to reduce plastic use at the school, as well as raising over £3,000 for the Marine Conservation Society.

Last Wednesday, a representative from the Marine Conservation Society, Belinda Laybourne, visited the school to find out more about this work, meeting some of those staff and pupils who have been spearheading the campaign to change things.

For example, the school has an Eco Team activity which has been recycling items and making things that are better for the environment, such as pine cone firelighters and homemade plastic free Christmas decorations, which are now on the Christmas tree in the school’s reception area.

A number of plastic-free options are now used by the catering department, such as ‘vegware’ for sandwich packaging, which is cardboard made from plants, and the ‘hydration station’ in the Loggia which students can use for juicy water to refill their own reusable bottles as an alternative to plastic drinks bottles.

A ‘Big Blue Day’ where students wore non-uniform with a blue theme, and a charity music concert in St Peter’s on the Waterfront in Ipswich contributed towards a total raised for the charity of £3,006, which will provide an excellent boost to their work in helping to preserve our oceans.

Ms Laybourne said afterwards: “I really enjoyed my time at the school learning of the waste reduction ideas and success. It was lovely to meet so many driven and enthusiastic students and staff! Thank you again for the incredible sum you have raised as a school, we greatly appreciate it, and as a charity, we rely on such donations to be successful in delivering our mission: ‘Creating flourishing seas and thriving people’.”

Ipswich School Headmaster Nicholas Weaver added: “Our pupils care greatly for the world around them, and we are delighted to have not only raised money to support the work of the Marine Conservation Society, but also to have raised awareness of we can each do as individuals to make a difference to the way we use plastics and other materials.”

The Marine Conservation Society is the UK’s leading charity for the protection of our seas, shores and wildlife. It has 20 full time employees and 7,500 volunteers. The volunteers go around schools and teach children about the oceans and ways we can help conserve them. They also arrange beach cleans and fundraisers locally.

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